Ken Langa, MD, PhD



Dr. Langa is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Institute for Social Research, a Research Scientist in the Veterans Affairs HSR&D; Center for Clinical Management Research, and an Associate Director of the Institute of Gerontology, all at the University of Michigan. He is also Associate Director of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a National Institute on Aging funded longitudinal study of 20,000 adults in the United States ( http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu ). Dr. Langa received an MD and PhD in Public Policy at the University of Chicago as a Fellow in the Pew Program for Medicine, Arts, and the Social Sciences. He is a board-certified General Internist who treats adult patients with chronic medical conditions. Dr. Langa’s research focuses on the epidemiology and costs of chronic disease in older adults, with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. He has published more than 125 peer-reviewed articles on these topics. He is currently studying the relationship of common cardiovascular risk factors, as well as acute illnesses such as sepsis and stroke, to cognitive decline and dementia. In 2007, Dr. Langa was a Visiting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Public Health at the University of Cambridge where he established ongoing collaborations with an interdisciplinary research team performing cross-national comparisons of the epidemiology and outcomes of dementia in the United States, England, and other countries.

Recent Publications:

Burden of cirrhosis on older Americans and their families: Analysis of the Health and Retirement Study
Rakoski MO, McCammon RJ, Piette JD, Iwashyna TJ, Marrero JA, Lok AS, Langa K, Volk M. Hepatology 2011. In Press.

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Does a helping hand mean a heavy heart? Helping behavior and well-being among spouse caregivers
Poulin M, Brown S, Ubel PA, Smith DM, Jankovic A, Langa K. Psychology and Aging 2010;25(1):108-117.

Recent Press Coverage:

"Decide for Me When I Can't," Most People Say
Health Day - January 21, 2009

Most People Support Alzheimer's Research Based on Family Consent
January 14, 2009